The Coffee Drink You Need to Be Sipping Now

You’ve read all about Bulletproof Coffee and spent October gorging on PSLs. (We’re not calling you basic. It’s just what people do.) But a quiet revolution is brewing--um, literally--in cafés throughout the city. Coffee nerds are sipping glasses of a formerly hard-to-spot drink: the cortado. Here’s a quick primer on the trendy caffeine jolt.

You’ve read all about Bulletproof Coffee and spent October gorging on PSLs. (We’re not calling you basic. It’s just what people do.) But a quiet revolution is brewing--um, literally--in cafés throughout the city. Coffee nerds are sipping glasses of a formerly hard-to-spot drink: the cortado. Here’s a quick primer on the trendy caffeine jolt.

It Comes from Spain. The Spanish word for “cut” is cortar, and the drink is espresso cut with a bit of milk. There will be no pop quiz.

It’s Not Crazy Milky. The ratio of milk to espresso in a cortado is pretty much one to one; a typical latte has double that amount of milk. Dan Weiss, owner of the local coffee company Dollop, puts it this way, “A latte can be a lot to drink for some people. A cortado is less of a stomach commitment, and more of a quick caffeine fix.”

So, it’s basically the cool kid’s latte. While there is milk in the equation, it’s a whole different experience. According to Weiss, “People who are espresso drinkers tend to lean in the direction of a cortado. It’s sort of a more serious coffee drinker’s latte.”

It Has a Sister Named "Cortadito". In Cuba, the drink is known as a cortadito, which is a bit sweeter than the cortado (but very similar indeed). You will also spot this term on local café menus.

You Can Get Your Fix Here: Speaking of local coffee shops, you can get your cortado/cortadito fix at spots like Café Integral, Ipsento and Fabcakes (and, of course, Dollop).

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