Sure, lots of our favorite movies are filmed on studio lots, in front of green screens or in foreign lands offering great tax credits. But you’d be surprised how many memorable scenes played out in real homes in the great US of A. Even better? A number of those houses are available to buy now. With several hitting the market this summer, we figured there was no better time to take a closer look. Because why live in a normal house when you could live in a famous house? 

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The “Sixteen Candles” House (Evanston, IL)

On the market for $1.5 million

You can now recreate Sam and Jake’s swoon-worthy first kiss on your own dining room table in the Evanston, Illinois, house where the movie was filmed. Located just outside Chicago, the 3,250-square-foot home boasts six bedrooms, six baths, a newly remodeled indoor kitchen and an outdoor kitchen with a stone fireplace and outdoor TV. Teenage angst not included.

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The “Father of the Bride” House (Alhambra, CA)

On the market for $2 million

It’s hard to think of a more adorable father/daughter film moment than the one-on-one basketball game between George and Annie Banks in Father of the Bride. That’s why super-fans will be thrilled to hear that the gorgeous L.A. colonial is currently on the market. Clocking in at 4,400 square feet, the house has four bedrooms, four baths and a new gourmet kitchen with a 90 (!) bottle wine fridge. Sounds perfect for entertaining--or coping with a beloved daughter’s recent engagement.

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“The Fugitive” House (Chicago, IL)

On the market for $3.5 million

Sure, Dr. Richard Kimble and his wife didn’t have the best luck here, but that doesn’t mean you can’t create many happy new memories. The home has been renovated since filming, adding two more floors, an elevator connecting them and a roof deck. Now 6,000 square feet, the house also features five bedrooms (three of which are master suites with fireplaces), five baths, a glass floor catwalk, an indoor swimming pool and a three-car garage. Let’s hope they also installed a security system.

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The “Groundhog Day” House (Woodstock, IL)

On the market for $645,000

If this classic Victorian mansion looks familiar, that’s probably because you’ve seen it over and over and over--in Groundhog Day, that is. Built in 1895, the fictional Cherry Street Inn is indeed a working bed-and-breakfast in Woodstock, Illinois that would make a pretty spectacular single-family home. At 5,800 square feet, the house has eight bedrooms, eight and a half baths, a gourmet kitchen with commercial-grade, stainless-steel appliances and an actual white picket fence. Now about that time-loop thing…

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Coldwell Banker

The “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” House (Highland Park, IL)

Sold in 2014 for $1.06 million

After five years on the market and several price cuts, the Highland Park home of Ferris’s best friend Cameron finally sold in 2014. With 4,300 square feet, four bedrooms, three baths and interior parking for four cars, it’s hard to believe it took this gorgeous mid-century modern so long to get snatched up. Maybe car enthusiasts can’t quite shake the image of that 1961 Ferrari smashing through the home’s glass wall and plummeting to the trees below? Just a guess. 

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“The Big Chill” House (Beaufort, SC)

Just sold for $2.8 million

The classic film about love and friendship takes place mostly in and around this stunning summer house, with a particularly memorable scene of the group dancing to “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” in the kitchen. Originally on the market for $3.5 million, the Beaufort, South Carolina, home has two wraparound porches, five bedrooms, eight bathrooms and sweeping views of the Beaufort River.

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The “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” Townhouse (New York, NY)

Sold in 2015 for $7.4 million

Holly Golightly’s life--at least in the first half of Breakfast at Tiffany’s--is downright enviable. Turns out the Upper East Side townhouse is too. 169 East 71st Street has four floors, four bedrooms, five baths, a library, multiple wood-burning fireplaces and an enclosed greenhouse. Fun fact: It’s also the former home of disgraced former Merrill Lynch broker and Martha Stewart conspirator Peter E. Bacanovic. Something tells us the current owners have plenty of topics for cocktail party fodder.

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Columbia Pictures

The “Something’s Gotta Give” House (Southampton, NY)

Sold in 2014 for $41 million

Diane Keaton fulfilled all of our Hamptons mansion beach house dreams in this 2003 movie. And with a price tag of $41 million, it’s safe to say that dream will forever stay a fantasy for most of us. But not for James Tisch, the CEO of Loews Corporation, who bought the home in 2014. And it’s easy to see why: Situated on almost two acres of oceanfront, the 7,700-square-foot house has seven bedrooms, eleven and a half bathrooms and a host of famous neighbors. And it’s not like Jack Nicholson really had a heart attack there.

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“The Big Lebowski” Bungalow (Venice, CA)

Sold in 2012 for $1.6 million

Some lucky dude gets to make White Russians in the 10,600-square-foot compound where The original Dude resided. The Venice, California, property features six one-bedroom cottages with spacious side-yards and a beautiful landscaped courtyard. The bungalow sold in 2012 after substantial price cuts and is apparently quite the tourist attraction. Let’s hope the new owners know the importance of rug selection when decorating.

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“The Amityville Horror” House (Amityville, NY)

On the market for $850,000

Who’s afraid of a little paranormal activity? The waterfront Long Island, New York, house that inspired the book and movie is back on the market with an asking price of $850,000. Tainted history aside, the home itself is quite impressive: 5,000 square feet, five bedrooms, three and a half baths and a number of upgrades. (Not to mention a boathouse and boat slip.) Oh, and the last owners replaced those creepy windows that looked like glowing eyeballs. So there’s that.

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