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Maybe your green thumb is itching for a new plant baby or you want to make your home lush and vibrant…but you lack the floor space for free-standing potted plants. One easy solution? Indoor hanging plants. Suspended from your ceilings, they’ll add the touch of green you’re after, without taking up any of your precious floor space.

But like all indoor plants, choosing one to start with can be daunting. Which plant is best for your home? How much light will it need? What kind of pot should you use? Is it pet- and kid-friendly? You might have as many questions as there are plants to choose from, but that’s where we come in. We did some digging (heh) and consulted with an indoor plant expert—Bloomscape’s very own Plant Mom, Joyce Mast—to come up with the ten best indoor hanging plants to elevate your space (plus tips on how to take care of your new friend).

RELATED: ‘Should I Sing to My Plants?’ and Other Common Houseplant Questions, Answered

Choosing the right indoor hanging plant

According to Mast, when looking for the best indoor hanging houseplants, you’ll first need to determine a couple of things: 

  • What kind of light will your plant enjoy?
  • How much time will you have to take care of its needs?
  • Are you able to reach the plant (to water it) once it is hanging in your home or office?

Once you’ve determined your ideal plant situation, then you can shop around. Below, ten varietals to get you started.

indoor hanging plants english ivy
mikroman6/Getty Images

1. English Ivy

Light requirement: Bright indirect to direct

Water requirement: Once a week

Pet-friendly: No

Botanically known as Hedera helix, this glossy, deep green climbing vine isn’t just for covering castles and prep-school campuses. In fact, it’s better suited as a hanging plant, and it’s a cinch to care for too. It has medium watering needs and likes medium light—if you want to hang it in a darker spot, try rotating it with another plant every few months.

Buy it ($20)

indoor hanging plants boston fern
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2. Boston Fern

Light requirement: Low

Water requirement: Twice a week

Pet-friendly:  Yes

Nephrolepis exaltata, or Boston fern, is feathery and high-impact but relatively easy to maintain (yep, even for beginners) in low-humidity conditions. It’s an air-purifier and it’s safe for pets, making it an ideal pick for families. Just make sure you give your plant enough space away from the ceiling to allow for proper air circulation.

Buy it ($25)

indoor hanging plants birds nest fern
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3. Bird’s Nest Fern

Light requirement: Low to bright indirect

Water requirement: Twice a week

Pet-friendly: Yes

“This lush and tropical plant enjoys low to medium light,” Mast says, “is easy to care for, pet-friendly and loves a bit of extra humidity—so place this one in a windowed bathroom or kitchen. Also known as Asplenium nidus, they get their name from the way their new growth first looks like a tiny bird egg before the frond unfurls. And the more light they get, the crinklier those fronds will grow in. Luckily, though, the bird’s nest fern also does well in low-light conditions, so it’s the one to choose if you want to brighten a dark corner in your home. Mast’s tip? “Never pour water in the center or crown since it will rot, but only under the leaves and onto the soil.”

Buy it ($35)

indoor hanging plants string of pearls
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4. String of Pearls

Light requirement: Bright indirect

Water requirement: Once every two to three weeks

Pet-friendly: No

The round pods on this pretty succulent plant aren’t just for looks—they’re actually filled with water to help your Senecio rowleyanus survive a drought (or um, your neglect). Thankfully, these hanging plants are easy to care for and require little more than a spot with indirect sunlight in your home. They’re ideal in spaces with high ceilings, so their vines have ample vertical space to sprawl. But FYI, this plant is mildly toxic, and can cause minor illness (gastrointestinal distress and skin irritation) if ingested by humans and pets.

Buy it ($16)

indoor hanging plants spider plant
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5. Spider Plant

Light requirement: Low to bright indirect

Water requirement: Once every two to four weeks

Pet-friendly: Yes

The graceful, spindly leaves of Chlorophytum comosum make it a great option for hanging, and thanks to its low-maintenance care requirements, it’s beginner-friendly too. Mast told us, “This whimsical plant enjoys medium to bright indirect light, is very easy to care for and is pet-friendly, too. This plant may produce little spiderettes (little spider plants) that can be cut off and placed in water to grow new roots and then be planted into the soil. You can share the new little baby with family and friends!” The more, the merrier.

Buy it ($35)

indoor hanging plants philodendron heartleaf
Courtesy of Bloomscape

6. Philodendron Heartleaf

Light requirement: Low to bright indirect

Water requirement: Once a week

Pet-Friendly: No

If you, like us, have always wanted a lush hanging plant that grows without much fuss, Philodendron cordatum green is the one. “These fast-growing heart-shaped plants enjoy low to bright indirect light areas,” Mast tells us, “and are very easy to care for.” They thrive in almost any environment, so the world (read: your home) is your oyster. Even better, Mast says it can withstand drying out from time to time: “Just water thorough and hang back up,” she says.

Buy it ($35)

indoor hanging plants babys tears
Dmf87/Getty Images

7. Baby’s Tears

Light requirement: Bright indirect

Water requirement: Once a week

Pet-friendly: Yes

Baby’s Tears, aka Helxine soleirolii, are common in terrariums because of their delicate, small leaves and thin stems. But put one in a hanging planter and it will really thrive, with trailing vines that spread quickly and spill over the edge of its pot. It does prefer humid conditions and hates to dry out, so try it in a bathroom with a window.

Buy it ($12)

indoor hanging plants burros tail
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8. Burro’s Tail

Light requirement: Direct

Water requirement: Once every two weeks

Pet-friendly: Yes

Burrow’s tail, Sedum morganianum (and also sometimes Donkey Tail), is a succulent like String of Pearls. Its funky, plump leaves are a little high maintenance but worth it: It will sometimes blossom in the summer months, with pink to red flowers at the ends of its “tails.” It’s best grown in full sunlight, so choose a very sunny spot or a room with a south-facing window for best growth. It should be watered moderately and regularly except in the winter, when it needs less watering. And about those leaves: They’re pretty delicate and can break easily, so choose its home wisely.

Buy it ($20)

indoor hanging plants silver satin pothos
dropStock/Getty Images

9. Silver Satin Pothos

Light requirement: Low to bright indirect

Water requirement: Once every two weeks

Pet-friendly: No

Silver satin pothos, Scindapsus pictus, is a classic choice for indoor hanging—it has elegant, dappled leaves and trailing vines. According to Mast, it enjoys “low to bright indirect light areas and looks lovely as a hanging plant because its patterned silvery green leaves drape over.” It prefers average to warm temperatures and moist but not wet soil (so don’t keep it saturated). Pothos will tell you what it needs: If the leaves start to turn yellow, you’ll know you’ve watered it too much, and if they turn crisp or brown, it’s getting too much direct sunlight. To reap its air-purifying benefits, hang it in your bedroom close to where you sleep. And like the spider plant, this one you can share: “Take little cutting from this one and share the plant love,” says Mast. “These are easy to propagate.”

Buy it ($20)

indoor hanging plants air plants
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10. Air Plants

Light requirement: Direct

Water requirement: Once or twice a week

Pet-friendly: Yes

Air plants might be the lowest maintenance of all indoor hanging plants—they don’t even require soil. As long as you water them once a week (whether it’s by soaking or spritzing) and keep them from shriveling up, they’ll accent your space well. Hang them in glass terrariums with holes for air circulation—we like these from Amazon.

Buy it ($20)

Hanging and care tips for indoor hanging plants

  • When choosing a container, don’t just go for style points. You should also consider the size and material in relation to your plant.
  • Ceramic pots will retain moisture and are best for plants that like humid environments, while clay-based containers dry out quickly and are better suited for plants that are sensitive to overwatering.
  • Containers with skinny openings create a vertical look and cause leaves to dangle, and wide openings allow leaves to spread horizontally.
  • Always use pots that have drainage holes and a saucer to make sure you don’t overwater, causing the plants' roots to drown, and make sure the saucer is always emptied of any excess water.
  • Also consider the height of your hanging plant. Long plants should hang higher to keep their leaves and branches from trailing on the floor. Smaller, shorter plants can hang lower for a better view. And don’t hang anything too high to the ceiling—this can prevent proper airflow to the plant.
  • You’ll have to take down your plant in order to water it, so don’t hang it so high that maintenance is unmanageable.
  • Room size matters too: Hang larger plants in larger rooms to give them space to spread out.
  • If you have pets, it’s always a good idea to hang your plants out of reach from your furry friends. Some plants can be toxic to animals (and kids) if ingested…and even if they’re not, it’s a mess waiting to happen.
RELATED: The 6 Best Herbs to Grow Indoors (Because They Look, Smell and Taste Great)

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