ComScore

6 Exterior Trends That Will Boost Your Curb Appeal in 2023

PureWow editors select every item that appears on this page, and the company may earn compensation through affiliate links within the story. You can learn more about that process here.

New year, new trends. While we often have interior design trends on the brain when January rolls around, what about the exterior of our homes? After all, everyone from the dog walker to the mailperson sees it (unlike that bathroom refresh you just completed), so why not give the outside of your home just as much personality as what’s inside? With that in mind, we spoke with Dzinly co-founder Jackie Mosher about the top exterior design trends in 2023, plus tips on how to go about the renovations.

"My biggest advice is do your due diligence; be realistic about your expectations and what you like or what you really don't like,” Mosher tells us. “Put together your inspirational images and really, really think about it. Sometimes people just need a little change. Try painting your trim or just changing your shutters or your front door color. See if that scratches the itch.”

5 Interior Design Trends Designers Are Ditching in 2023


Meet the Expert

  • Jackie Mosher, co-founder of Dzinly, an exterior design and architecture company that provides online services and design renderings within days.
Dzinly

1. Dark & Earth-Toned Paints Create Friendly, Inviting Spaces

In 2020, there was a boom in demand for home offices as many people began working from home. Although there has been a gradual return to the workplace, Mosher highlights the continued desire for homes to act as warm, inviting, safe spaces that shield us from a tumultuous world. She shares that dark and earth tones are in, as well as warm whites, which are ideal for those who want to change up their exterior without straying too much from a classic look.

"White is obviously timeless and a safe choice, but the creamy, warmer whites are being selected more recently versus the icy shade,” Mosher shares. Other hues to consider? Navy blues, forest greens, dark browns and maroons will help bring the calming aura of nature into a home.

Paint Colors to Try:

Dzinly

2. Monochrome Is in, High Contrast Is Out

The past five years have seen an ode to high-contrast looks—picture white houses with black trim and the like—but the scale is tipping in a monochrome direction. This is all, Mosher says, in a bid for originality.

“We hear people say ‘I don't want to look like the neighbors. I don't want to look like every house on the block,’” she tells us.

Since high-contrast paint combinations are so bold, they really stand out. And the more ubiquitous they’ve become, the more they start to feel…cookie cutter. As a result, the pendulum is swinging in the other direction.

"[Monochrome is] just an easy way to look incredibly chic and sophisticated without [being] in-your-face like high contrast is. Interesting enough, HGTV does the Dream Home Giveaway every year, and their 2023 house is a monochromatic palette.”

Expect to see the monochrome look really shine when it comes to people’s entryways: "I feel like in the past year or two, people were really excited about a massive pop in the color [of the front door],” Mosher says. “Now, I feel like they want it flowing with the same color as the trim.”

Dzinly

3. Wood, Metal, Stone, Oh My: Mix Up Those Textures

No one said your home exterior had to be all brick, all stone or all wood. Mixing up materials lends visual interest, especially when you incorporate something as an accent piece. For example, Mosher has noticed that stained wood has become a popular choice, finding its way into header beams on a porch, windowsill details, pediments, gables and wood plank siding, just to name a few.

“[Other] great options for the textured materials [are] stone, siding and board and batten. Metal roofs and metal awnings (the cheaper version of the metal roofs) are becoming super popular as well,” she adds.

When it comes to using these materials in your home exterior, Mosher recommends using gables or bump-outs, which will create a different design plane. A more budget-friendly option is to use the same cladding material (whether that’s stone, wood or brick, etc.) across the exterior but to change the color to one in the same complementary family.

“You can pull the darkest or the lightest [color] from the stone or brick, and you would use that color for the gable or the bump out,” she explains.

Sometimes, all it takes to add a pop of originality to your home—especially if you live in a neighborhood full of track houses—is a coat of paint over the brick or stone, another trend on the uptick.

exterior design trends 2023 copper downspouts
Rick Van der Poorten/Getty Images

4. Copper Downspouts Add Warmth and Charm

OK, a downspout is not the most glamorous thing that comes to mind when we think of home upgrades, but copper lends warmth and charm to your exterior. Though Mosher concedes that a copper downspout is on the pricier side, it would be well worth the investment if you can swing it.

"They will way outlive your lifetime; this is no exaggeration. You're getting what you're paying for, assuming you're in your forever home,” she asserts. Though, before committing, you’ll want to be sure you like the patinated (tarnished) look. While some find it rustic and charming, others want a spotless gutter. Both can be achieved, but it’s good to have your expectations set.

"Typically, [patina] takes about five to 20 years [to develop], depending on the weather conditions,” Mosher reveals, adding that heavy rain and snow—or living close to lakes or the ocean—can speed things up. “When they tarnish, the patina that forms is natural and actually helps protect your gutters from corrosion.”

If you like copper but not the patina, Mosher says that the material is fairly easy to care for with a soft brush, dish soap and water or anti-oxidant coatings. However, you’ll need to be prepared to devote some time to the upkeep—but it’s only required every few years and the payoff is high. “It's like putting on a brighter shade of lipstick. I think there's that appeal; [it] nods back to the high-contrast [look while also segueing out of it].”

5. Consider Switching to a Metal Roof

Looking at a roof renovation? Instead of the typical asphalt, consider metal. According to Mosher, metal is the most sustainable roofing choice because of the recycled material content. Often, metal roofing contains steel and aluminum (the most common), but copper, zinc and stainless steel can be used, too. Another case for the metal roof? It can withstand a whole lot of bad weather and be relatively unscathed.

“It is incredibly durable. This means fewer repairs, fewer replacements,” Mosher elaborates. “Metal roofs can sustain wind gusts up to 140 mph, and they won't corrode or crack.”

Like with the copper downspouts, metal roofs do come with a higher price tag—but also promise to be long-lasting. Should you want to incorporate metal into your roof, Mosher suggests that you don’t necessarily need a full replacement. So long as there are different planes (dormers, multi-level homes, awnings, porches), you can juxtapose materials for a modern twist.

exterior trends 2023 geometric windows
Roger Brooks/Getty Images

6. Trimless, Geometric Windows Are on the Rise

Paint, roofing, siding...and yet there are still more ways to customize your home exterior, namely by getting creative with your doors and windows. Mosher tells us that many are opting for no trim on their windows, which yields an incredibly clean look. And, yes, this is even happening on “traditional” homes like Colonials.

“People are throwing in larger-sized windows where typically they were built much smaller,” she says. “[This creates a] larger, sleeker, cleaner look.” Additionally, geometric shapes are all the rage: From ovals and octagons to the sought-after half-moon, homeowners are saying goodbye to the square and rectangle.

As always, any sort of work you do on your home can be a big decision, and as Mosher advises, it’s best not to rush into things. Don’t be afraid to make inspiration boards, grab all the paint swatches, and go out to see the materials for yourself.