ComScore

The Secret to The Home Edit’s Perfectly Organized Drawers You Never Noticed (Until Now)

There’s nothing sexy about a junk drawer—until The Home Edit gets their hands on it. The company, headed by Joanna Teplin and Clea Shearer, has become a household name for making the awkward corners of people’s homes something to gawk at. It’s easy to go down an Instagram rabbit hole, scrolling through every pantry and bookshelf they’ve Roy G. Bived, then binge their Netflix show and start dogearing pages of their decluttering books, vowing that you, too, shall have cabinets where all of your flour, sugar and Froot Loops are displayed in clear, acrylic containers labeled with swooping calligraphy; the kind of kitchen where you can finding what you need is practically intuitive.

And so you buy up every tray and divider and compartmentalized insert set, and after a few days…you open your drawers to absolute chaos. It’s not because you live with animals who paw about ruthlessly for whatever they need, without regard to your carefully curated system. OK, it’s not just because of those hooligans. It’s because those dividers haven’t been properly secured—a key ingredient to The Home Edit’s success that you wouldn’t notice from their photos.

6 Game-Changing Tips We Learned from 'Get Organized with The Home Edit'


MATT SAYLES/NETFLIX

“We like to add a tiny bit of museum gel dots that just hold the container in place in your drawer so it doesn’t shake around,” The Home Edit co-founder Joanna Teplin revealed in a recent livestream for Nature Made Wellblends, a vitamin company.

With those words, it was like the heavens parted and a choir of angels sang—why hadn’t we thought of this before? Sure, you could measure every drawer and buy custom-sized dividers fitted to each space, but that gets pricey, fast. For a mere $11, you can buy a pack of 350 clear, removable adhesive putty dots from Amazon, having them arrive at your door in two days’ time (thanks, Prime!). That’s enough to secure at least 87.5 items in your house (assuming you’re attaching dots to all four corners, which may be overkill, but let’s err on the side of caution).

Why, you could even split it with a friend, only paying $5.50 apiece to finally get all of those little drawer organizers firmly locked in place, then—when said hooligan family members slam open and shut your drawers—gleefully watch from around the corner as everything stays in place.

Of course, the well-secured organizers don’t mean a thing if what’s in them is a hot mess. Teplin has advice for that too: “Simplicity is key,” she explains. “We group all the items by category and store them in separate bins.”

Each drawer is given a purpose—a need it will fulfill—and only items that correspond to it go there. (Teplin is particularly passionate about keeping only items related to her bedtime routine in her nightstand, otherwise the random clutter “leaks into my brain and dreams and everything else.”)

So, to summarize: Determine your purpose for each nook and cubby, organize accordingly and don’t forget your museum gel dots. It’s the only thing standing between your junk drawer and its fleeting moments of Instagram fame.

Psst: And if you’re not into glue dots, we ten-out-of-ten would recommend investing in an OXO expandable drawer for your silverware. It can fit to fill just about any size drawer, and it’s got enough room for large and small forks and spoons, butter knives and steak knives (unlike some of those four-slot organizers, which force you to jumble ‘em together).