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All Sections / Your Literary Twin, According to Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type

We’ve all had that uncanny moment when we turn a page and realize “Wait…this is me.” There’s a reason you feel a kinship with certain fictional heroines: They’ve been skillfully written to reflect a lot of our real-life traits in all their complex combinations, as illustrated by the Myers-Briggs type indicator. Read on to find out which character is your literary soul sister. 

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character katniss
Lionsgate

ISTJ: Katniss Everdeen, The Hunger Games

Loyal, honest, self-sufficient: Katniss is driven by a powerful sense of responsibility, and her every action reflects that, whether it’s protecting others or speaking up for what’s right. Needless to say, anyone who doesn’t share those values better get out of the way.

character olan

ISFJ: O-lan, The Good Earth

O-lan’s quiet determination and humility are hallmarks of ISFJs, the most selfless type. While she may put everyone else’s needs ahead of her own, she also has a strong sense of her own value—maybe because she knows she’s secretly running the show.

character janeeyre
Focus Features

INFJ: Jane Eyre, Jane Eyre

Thoughtful, committed to her principles and acutely in tune with her environment, Jane moves through a pretty messed-up life about as gracefully as one can, all while pondering the deeper meaning in everything. (Aka what's known in the modern world as overthinking.)

character lila
Europa Editions

INTJ: Lila Cerullo, The Neapolitan Novels

The narrator’s enigmatic best friend has a razor-sharp mind that’s constantly ten steps ahead of everyone else and a distaste for social conventions. And her fierce independence makes even those she's closest to wonder if they really know her. Sound familiar?

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character nancy
Penguin Group

ISTP: Nancy Drew, the Nancy Drew series

The mystery-solving maven is curious and analytical, with a keen sense of observation and a tendency to get totally engrossed in whatever she’s working on. No wonder she’s been an enduring role model for almost a century.

character celie
Warner Bros.

ISFP: Celie, The Color Purple

The protagonist of the Pulitzer-winning novel (and Oscar-nominated movie and Tony-winning Broadway show) is empathetic and attentive to the feelings of others, looking to find harmony even through suffering (in this case, a lot of it).

character janie
HarperCollins

INFP: Janie Crawford, Their Eyes Were Watching God

The INFP lives and breathes idealism, even when her circumstances don’t line up with her values. Janie’s romanticism might be more than a little baffling to others, but to her, it’s the light that keeps her going.

character meg
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

INTP: Meg Murry, A Wrinkle in Time

Brainy and introspective, the heroine of the beloved YA tale feels like a misfit in her regular life. It only takes an interplanetary space-time journey to embrace her inquisitive, logical (if sometimes daydreamy) tendencies.

character scarlett
MGM

ESTP: Scarlett O’Hara, Gone With the Wind

The positives: charming, spontaneous and bold. The negatives: impulsive, competitive and easily bored. She might be one of the more divisive heroines on this list, but there’s a reason people are still talking about her 80 years after the book’s publication. 

character daisy
Warner Bros.

ESFP: Daisy Buchanan, The Great Gatsby

Like all ESFPs, Daisy wants to live life to the fullest. Her vivacity draws people to her like a magnet—which is good, because she’s not a fan of being alone—but thinking beyond the present moment isn’t her forte.

character jo

ENFP: Jo March, Little Women

Energetic, optimistic and creative, Jo has a vivid imagination and thrives on entertaining others and dreaming about the future. Her enthusiasm and high expectations often lead to frustration and disappointment, though, when they inevitably clash with reality.

character violet
Netflix

ENTP: Violet Baudelaire, A Series of Unfortunate Events

The eldest Baudelaire orphan is eloquent, innovative and resourceful, even in the face of, uh…unfortunate events. Her hobby of inventing things, MacGyver-style, fits right in with the ENTP’s interest in engineering and problem-solving.

character hermione
Warner Bros.

ESTJ: Hermione Granger, the Harry Potter series

Let’s be real: Without Hermione, Harry and Ron would never have gotten anything done. Sure, she might get teased for being a rule-follower, but her pragmatism, attention to detail and dedication to the good of the group are actually skills that translate outside the wizarding world.

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character dorothy
MGM

ESFJ: Dorothy, The Wizard of Oz

True to her type, Dorothy is the cheerleader of the group: positive, outgoing and supportive. Her downfall? A fear of conflict and criticism. (Think about it: The Wicked Witch could be a metaphor for so many things.)

character lizzie
Focus Features

ENFJ: Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice

Lizzy’s conscientiousness and strong (if sometimes misguided) opinions are typical of her type: She might hide behind a veil of sarcasm, but she cares deeply about her family and her values—even if her first impressions sometimes lead her astray. (For the record, Mr. Darcy is totally an INTJ.)

character irene
BBC

ENTJ: Irene Adler, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Not everyone can engage in ongoing mind games with Sherlock Holmes, but there’s nothing an ENTJ loves more than a challenge. Confident and commanding with zero patience for incompetence, she’s someone who gets things done (and, OK, maybe intimidates people a tiny bit).

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