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'80s and '90s Babies Have Spoken: Here Are 6 Millennial Trends Taking Over in 2023

Misunderstood by their boomer parents and mystified by Gen Z influencers on TikTok, millennials are redefining what it means to be an adult in 2022. Some began working remotely during the pandemic and never plan on stepping into an office again. Others are trying out gentle parenting methods they learned from Instagram (on their kids and their dog). But what’s in store for America’s largest generation in the coming year? From how they’ll style their hair to how they’ll travel, here are the top millennial trends we’ll see in 2023.

6 Trends That Define Millennial Marriages


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1. Infladating

Amid the frustrations of phubbing, ghosting and love bombing, dating shouldn’t also drain your bank account. Plenty of Fish predicts 2023 will be the year of “infladating,” or dating with rising inflation costs in mind. The dating site reports 48 percent of millennials and Gen Z are opting for casual, budget-conscious outings, ditching upscale dinner reservations in favor of quick coffee dates, picnic lunches and walks in the park.

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2. Side Parts and Wet Hair

Remember when parting your hair to the side was considered “cheugy?” In a victory for millennials everywhere, middle parts are finally moving aside. Designers like Vivienne Westwood, Bibhu Mohapatra, Tom Ford and Tommy Hilfiger showcased off-center parts on Spring 2023 runways. And along with side swept hair, ‘90s wet grunge will be equally as trendy among millennials. Karen Miller, lead stylist at Spoke and Weal Soho, says the editorial look is no longer reserved for red carpets and runways. Miller is creating the damp style on clients with all curl patterns and textures (so ready your spray bottles).

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3. Sittervising

Rather than attending to your kid’s every need at playtime, like constructing a Lego castle or starring in an imaginary play, the latest parenting trend suggests we take a much-needed step back. “Sittervising,” or keeping an eye on your kid while you sit nearby, has gained popularity among (exhausted) millennial parents thanks to Susie Allison, M. Ed, mom of three and founder of the Busy Toddler Instagram account. Allison’s method fosters creative, independent play while ensuring your kids are safe in the process. In her post introducing the art of sittervising, Allison writes, “Kids need play without adults. Adults need time to recharge from kids.” And so be it if this playdate includes a couple sips of Pinot Noir.

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4. Investing in Pet Wellness

You’ve been meaning to book your annual physical for months. Your dog, on the other hand? Fluffy is chowing down on organic kibble and attending weekly acupuncture appointments. The pet wellness movement, which includes supplements, nutritional foods and functional medicine, is making waves among millennial dog and cat parents. According to Nielson IQ, search terms relating to raw and refrigerated pet food, dental health, remedies for sensitive stomachs and calming pet products have all spiked since last year.

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5. Job Hopping

Struggling to secure pay raises and battling burnout, millennials are job hopping more than ever. And they’re jumping around for good reason. A recent Deloitte workplace study tells us 39 percent of millennials chose jobs that offered better work life balance, 39 percent transitioned to companies that valued their learning and development and 27 percent made the switch to earn a higher salary. This generation also strives to speak out and promote change within their organizations, from sustainability efforts to diversity and inclusion. Sixty-five percent of millennials who feel empowered at work report staying beyond five years at their companies, says the study. So listen up, employers.

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6. The Great Hotel Comeback

Vacation home rental woes have become an internet inside joke, with guests pointing to exorbitant fees, long chore lists and security concerns. Travelers also worry these vacation spots harm local housing markets, turning what could be long-term housing for locals into short-term rentals. So what will Millennial travel look like in 2023? Per Expedia Group, alternative wellness getaways will be all the rage among the age group, with hotels now “offering advanced rejuvenation programs and hands-on activities that encourage travelers to get up close and personal with nature.” The most popular excursions: forest bathing and fruit harvesting.