Cheese Addicts, Rejoice: Full-Fat Is Healthier Than Low-Fat

Have you ever forced yourself to bypass an enticing block of cheddar and instead reach for the low-fat mozzarella, all in the name of your health? Those days are over: A study conducted at the University of Copenhagen found that full-fat cheese had no effect on bad cholesterol—and actually increased good cholesterol (which keeps bad cholesterol in check).

Over the course of 12 weeks, one lucky group was fed a “high daily intake” of cheese (about three ounces), while the other two consumed reduced-fat cheese or an equivalent amount of bread and jam. (This study sounds amazing.) The full-fat-cheese group showed no significant difference in risk indicators like waist size and insulin, and ended up with higher HDL (good cholesterol) levels than the bread-and-jam group.

So what’s significant about this? Saturated fat has long been considered the enemy when it comes to increased risk of heart disease and stroke. But more and more studies are suggesting that might not be the case.

Does this mean you have an excuse to go to town on a wheel of Brie? Well, probably not. (Still waiting on that study.) But it does mean the next time you’re browsing the dairy aisle, you should make your selections based on what you like, not on fat content. Because let’s face it: Cheddar makes it better. 

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