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9 Omakases in NYC That Won’t Cost an Arm and a Leg

In case you missed it, food prices are soaring all over the country and the restaurant scene in NYC is no exception. Here, a sushi meal can easily set you back a few hundred bucks per person. Fortunately, there are more affordable options in the city—you just have to know where to look.

Omakase, a Japanese meal tradition translating to “I’ll leave it up to you,” entrusts the diner’s experience to the sushi chef, who prepares a prix fixe series of dishes that showcase their skills and creativity. This type of dining gained prominence stateside thanks in no small part to the gorgeous 2011 documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi, which followed expert sushi chef Jiro Ono in Tokyo. And while a meal at the renowned Japanese restaurant currently goes for around $420 and lasts less than 30 minutes, you can get a similar experience minus the hefty price tag right here in NYC.

Here, we’ve rounded up nine places in the city where you can get your fresh-fish fix while still saving up for a trip to Japan—and all of them cost $100 or less (not including tax, tips or drinks).

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Sushi Katsuei

1. Sushi Katsuei

With two locations to choose from (Park Slope and West Village), offerings at both outposts include a mix of reliable and surprising choices, like trout, sea bream, uni, barracuda and firefly squid. Prices are slightly more affordable in Brooklyn, where the sushi omakase is $57, and the sashimi and sushi omakase is $77 (compared with Manhattan’s $65 for sushi and $95 for the combo). Either way, you’ll leave stuffed and happy.

Multiple locations; sushikatsuei.com

Moko

2. Moko

This intimate East Village eatery offers a 15-course omakase for just $65 that includes 13 pieces of nigiri, an appetizer and dessert (oh hello, strawberry banana ice cream topped with toasted rice crisps). There’s also an 18-course omakase for $100 featuring miso soup, two appetizers, 14 pieces of nigiri and dessert. Even better? Moko is BYOB, so you can pick up a bottle of sake or a couple of beers from around the corner before you dine. Saving money never tasted so good.

138 2nd Ave., New York; mokonyc.com

3. Sushi Dojo

If you can handle the club-friendly musical accompaniment, you’re in for a real treat where a meal has the potential to include simpler options amid more experimental choices. (Gold leaf, anyone?) Sushi Dojo offers a $98 chef’s choice of 15 pieces of sushi and a hand roll, plus a sushi and sashimi option for $128 (available at the bar only).

110 First Ave.; sushidojonyc.restaurant

Hasaki

4. Hasaki

A neighborhood stalwart that’s been operating since 1984, Hasaki serves both “traditional” and “special” omakase dinners. The traditional option includes nine pieces of sushi and one roll for $70, while the sushi and sashimi option comes with one fatty tuna roll (yes, please) and costs $80.

210 E. Ninth St.; hasakinyc.com

5. Uotora

Located in Crown Heights, Uotora’s physical space is as bare bones as its website. But that doesn’t prevent chefs Hiroyuki Kobayashi and Atsuomi Hotta from churning out crowd-pleasers at their restaurant, serving a ten-course omakase for $95.

1075 Bergen St., Brooklyn; uotorabk.com

6. Sushi By Bou

Former Sushi Dojo and Sushi on Jones chef David Bouhadana now runs three spots of his own that all feature the same quick-service omakase concept: $50 for 12 pieces that must be consumed within 30 minutes. As long as you arrive on time (before your reservation is given away), we promise you won’t feel rushed eating signature dishes like his “tres amigos” bite of ikura, uni and a quail egg.

Multiple locations; sushibybou.com

7. Neta Shari

This cozy restaurant in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, opened up a year ago and has been earning rave reviews ever since for its 15-course Edomae-style $75 omakase. Here, diners can expect tasty combinations such as otoro with truffle sauce, saltwater eel with sea salt and yuzu, and chawanmushi (a savory egg custard dish) with truffle and roe.

1718 86th St, Brooklyn; netashari.nyc

8. Kakurega Sushi

This Flushing eatery offers three omakase options: $98 for 14 courses, including four appetizers, eight pieces of sushi, miso soup, and a dessert; $138 for 17 courses, including five appetizers, nine pieces of sushi, a handroll, miso soup, and a dessert; and then if you want to splurge, $168 for 16 courses, including six appetizers, eight premium pieces of sushi, miso soup and a dessert.

133-44 37th Avenue, Basement, Flushing; kakuregasushiny.com

9. Sushi On Jones

When the original Noho sushi counter—part of an outdoor food court—opened in 2016 with its 30-minute tasting sessions, the concept seemed odd to many New Yorkers. But it’s actually modeled after Japan’s quick-service subway kiosks. Now there are three (indoor) outposts in the West Village, LES and Hell’s Kitchen, and all locations serve a $58 twelve-course menu that includes items like arctic char and Wagyu beef. (Unlike those subway kiosks, however, reservations are accepted.)

Multiple locations; sushionjones.com