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11 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in March

What do Beyoncé, the Creature from the Black Lagoon and Elijah from Girls have in common? On the surface, not much. They are, however, all featured in some of this month’s most exciting new books. Add these 11 titles to your Amazon cart immediately.

10 New YA Books to Get Excited About This Season


cover: st. martin's press; background: Edalin/getty images

queen Bey By Veronica Chambers (march 5)

From the editor of the best-selling anthology The Meaning of Michelle, this collection of essays by Lena Waithe, Melissa Harris Perry and more celebrates Beyoncé as an artist, leader, mother and black feminist.

cover: riverhead books; background: Edalin/getty images

gingerbread By Helen Oyeyemi (march 5)

Oyeyemi’s (Boy, Snow, Bird) latest is influenced by the strange place gingerbread holds in classic children's stories and concerns a family whose legacy centers on a gingerbread recipe. Like her previous work, it’s wildly imaginative and whip-smart.

cover: viking; background: Edalin/getty images

the Altruists By Andrew Ridker (march 5)

This darkly funny debut novel is about a professor at a Midwestern college who, unable to keep up with his mortgage, plots to win back the inheritances his late wife left for their children.

cover: Schwartz & Wade; background: Edalin/getty images

yes She Can By Molly Dillon (march 5)

This anthology, written by young women for young women, features essays from ten employees who worked in President Obama’s administration in their 20s. Inspiring and relatable, these stories are about stepping up to challenges and getting more women and girls involved in government.

cover: Crown Archetype; background: Edalin/getty images

era Of Ignition By Amber Tamblyn (march 5)

In her late 20s, actress Tamblyn had an identity crisis. Struggling to move into writing and directing, she entered into what she calls an Era of Ignition—basically, a period of self-reflection that inspired her to get involved in political activism. Her book is part memoir, part feminist call-to-arms.

cover: Hanover Square Press; background: Edalin/getty images

the Lady From The Black Lagoon By Mallory O’meara (march 5)

Milicent Patrick was one of Disney’s first female animators and the only woman in history to create an iconic movie monster (The Creature from the Black Lagoon). Horror-film enthusiast O’Meara set out to find out why so few people know about her legacy.

cover: Crown Archetype; background: Edalin/getty images

too Much Is Not Enough By Andrew Rannells (march 12)

Known for starring roles in The Book of Mormon and on Girls, Rannells’s success in showbiz has been hard-won. His sweet and funny memoir is about coming of age as a sexually confused kid in the Midwest, bad auditions, bad relationships and becoming the star he knew he could be.

cover: Abrams Press; background: Edalin/getty images

invisible Women By Caroline Criado Perez (march 12)

Subtitled “Data Bias in a World Designed for Men,” Criado Perez’s book explores how so much data fails to take gender into account, treating men as the default and women as atypical—much to women’s detriment.

cover: Gallery/Scout Press; background: Edalin/getty images

queenie By Candice Carty-williams (march 19)

In this Bridget Jones-esque story, a Jamaican British woman working at a London newspaper seeks comfort in the wrong places after a messy breakup from her white boyfriend. 

cover: Scribner; background: Edalin/getty images

sing To It By Amy Hempel (march 26)

Each story in this collection—Hempel’s first in more than a decade—introduces characters who are lonely, adrift and searching for connection, from a spurned wife to a volunteer who relates more to dogs than to people.

cover: Atria Books; background: Edalin/getty images

unbecoming By Anuradha Bhagwati (march 26)

After spending her whole life trying to please her strict Indian parents, Bhagwati abandoned her Ivy League grad school career to join the Marines. Her powerful and inspiring memoir is about pushing yourself beyond your limits.