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New Super-Upsetting Survey Reveals Millennials No Longer Take Lunch Breaks
Jamie Grill/Getty Images

I'd like to believe that the common stereotypes about millennials—that they're lazy, egotistical and addicted to their phones—are completely false. But overachiever? That's something millennials can definitely add to their (overly stylized) resumes, especially because they—gasp!—like to work through their lunch break.

Yep, according to a new survey by Tork, maker of nearly half of the napkins used in the food service industry, millennials (aka the generation born between 1980 and 2000, including this story's author) feel more pressure not to take a lunch break than their peers.

TBH, that doesn't really jibe with the millennials I know who love pizza and avocados and posting about them on their Instagram (yes, yes, I am talking about myself), but that's neither here nor there.

This is a big deal, since millennial workers make up the largest generation currently in the U.S. workforce, and the survey revealed that a whopping 37 percent of millennial workers don't take a lunch break.

Also, millennials are three times more likely than baby boomers to believe co-workers would judge them negatively if they took a regular lunch break. (This is very bad news, you guys.)

Joy Bauer, nutrition and health expert for NBC’s Today show and host of NBC's Health & Happiness, said that taking a lunch break is important to your health. In a press release about the survey, Bauer said the health benefits of taking time away from your desk for lunch are numerous, and include a more positive mood, increased concentration and productivity and less burnout.

But of course, many do take a break—the millennials I know (myself included) are obsessed with lunch. From Shake Shack to sushi, that's all my co-workers and I can talk about sometimes.

So, for all those 20-somethings too ashamed to go out for lunch, please, do yourself (and your health) a favor. Go eat.

RELATED: The Satiating Diet Might Be More Effective Than Keto, According to Science

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