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We get it: Casually picking up a finance book to pore over at your leisure on the weekend isn’t necessarily your idea of a good time. But there are quite a few pearls of wisdom to be gained (not to mention dollars to be saved) if you plough through. That’s why we cherry-picked the most genius takeaways from eight of our go-to finance books. Read on.

RELATED: How to Save $1,000 This Summer (and Still Go On Vacation)

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Cover: Crown Business; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

Financially Fearless: The Learnvest Program for Taking Control of Your Money by Alexa von Tobel

The Takeaway: Perfect for budgeting beginners, Von Tobel swears by the perfect-for-budgeting-beginners 50/20/30 rule—aka 50 percent of your income goes to essentials like rent and groceries, 20 percent goes to financial priorities like paying off debt or building an emergency savings and 30 percent covers your lifestyle. (Yay, eating out!)

badass at making money LIST
Cover: Viking; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth by Jen Sincero

The Takeaway: If you’re afraid to talk about money, not even the best financial counselor in the world could help you double your cash. What will help is getting specific: What are your spending goals? How much do they cost? How will you feel when you achieve them? (The details matter.)

RELATED: How to Worsen Your Finances in 32 Easy Steps

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Cover: Simon and Schuster; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

Make Your Kid a Money Genius (Even If You’re Not) by Beth Kobliner

The Takeaway: Attention parents: You don’t have to be good at math to be good with money. The little things (like delayed gratification and teaching kids how to set aside cash for spending, saving and giving) are the best indicators that your kids will fare better financially as adults.

what your financial advisor isnt telling you
Cover: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

What Your Financial Advisor Isn’t Telling You By Liz Davidson

The Takeaway: Employee perk alert: Financial wellness programs (basically, complimentary money coaching) are becoming a popular benefit offered by employers. Don’t have one? Davidson breaks it down: a 401(k) match, FSA, free legal services and more could be money you’re leaving on the table. (Her road map: Talk to HR.)

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Cover: Hay House, Inc.; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

Money, A Love Story by Kate Northrup

The Takeaway: Like it or not, money is one of the most meaningful relationships of our lives. But things we value often don’t line up with how we spend. Kate’s advice: Put the “oxygen mask” on yourself first. (Be honest—with others and yourself—about purchases that are sabotaging your goals.)

women and money
Cover: Spiegel and Grau; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

Women and Money by Suze Orman

The Takeaway: This one’s a road map to financial security in the form of a five-month “save yourself” plan. Suze boils down the most important to-dos for long-term security: Fix your FICO score (yep, it’s possible), set up dedicated checking and saving accounts and actually write a will.

RELATED: 5 Ways to Improve Your Credit Score…Quickly

total money makeover
Cover: Thomas Nelson; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

The Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey

The Takeaway: According to Dave, all debt is bad. (He says keeping up with the Joneses is what gets us there in the first place.) His approach: Set a budget, handle late bills hurting your credit, then set aside $1,000 in emergency savings. From there, he’s all about the snowball approach.

you re so money
Cover: Crown Business; Background: 31moonlight31/Getty Images

You’re So Money by Farnoosh Torabi

The Takeaway: Money requires prioritizing. That’s why Farnoosh recommends handling needs (taxes, retirement, housing, food) before debt. But after those bases are covered, she’s all about smart investments, like moving money to an online bank. Oh, and this sage advice: If you aren’t 100 percent sure you need it, skip it.

RELATED: How to Be Better With Money in Just 30 Days

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