As much as you adore dogs, you don’t love the idea of your pup covering every single surface of your house (and your body) with a nice thick layer of their hair. The dogs that shed the most are typically double-coated breeds. This isn’t always the case, but it’s a fairly good prediction of how much fur you can expect to find floating around your house. And FYI, all dogs shed at least a little bit—even the hypoallergenic ones. However, if you’re trying to avoid constant vacuuming or allergic reactions to pet dander, you may not want to go with a breed known for its ability to cover everything with a layer of hair.

Types of dog coats

There are many different types of dog coats. Some pups will inherit a single type of coat from their parents, while others may have combination coats. Understanding what type of dog coat you’re dealing with will determine how often you need to brush, bathe and trim your dog. Grooming isn’t just a luxury for show dogs; it’s a necessary part of dog ownership that keeps them happy and healthy. When researching a breed’s coat, you’ll need to understand layers, length and texture.

A double coat means a dog has two layers of fur: a soft, short undercoat and a coarse, long overcoat. Undercoats protect canines from external nuisances (bugs, dirt) and help regulate temperature. Overcoats are designed to protect the undercoat and skin from heat, sun and other potentially harmful elements. A single coat is exactly what it sounds like—one layer of fur all over your dog’s body. It can be any texture or length.

If a dog’s fur is less than two inches long, it’s considered a short coat. That means that longer than two inches is a long coat. Long-haired breeds will require more at-home grooming, like brushing, to ensure they don’t knot, which can trap smells and parasites. Funnily enough, just because a dog’s hair is long doesn’t automatically mean more shedding. Some of the dogs who shed the most are short-haired breeds.

Finally, texture plays a big role in grooming and shedding. Silky and smooth coats look exactly as you’d expect: shiny and straight. Wire coats are made up of coarse, brittle hair that is almost rough to the touch. These may require more intense grooming practices, depending on the breed. Heavy coats are often associated with fluffy dogs or breeds bred for cold climates. Corded coats are basically made up of intentional clumps of fur, like dreadlocks. These coats, and curly coats, actually shed less than other textures.

Types of shedding

Coat type impacts how often your dog sheds. Double-coated breeds are usually seasonal shedders, which means that come spring and fall, you can expect a few weeks of constant shedding. This is normal! It also happens in addition to regular, year-round shedding. It’s like leaves falling off a tree to make way for new growth. Single-coated breeds pretty much shed a consistent amount all year (and less overall than double-coated breeds).

Breeds that are hypoallergenic or non-shedding tend to be terriers with wire coats or pups with curly coats, like poodles. Technically, all dogs shed at least a little bit. But knowing what you’re getting yourself into will help inform decisions like which vacuum to buy and how many lint rollers to keep in each room. Without further ado, the 15 dog breeds that shed the most.

RELATED: 28 Non-Shedding Dogs (Because You’re Allergic But Desperate for a Pet)

Dogs that Shed the Most Akita
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1. Akita

Height: 24-28 inches

Weight: 70-130 pounds

Personality: Loyal, Protective

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Medium Length

Life Expectancy: 10-13 years

Akitas have thick, medium-length double coats that require ample brushing. They come in many colors, from black to brown, red to white and beyond. Their undercoats may even be a completely different color than their overcoats. Brush them weekly to keep their coats healthy. Seasonal shedding from an Akita is something to behold, so get ready for a hair storm.

Dogs that Shed the Most American Eskimo Dog
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2. American Eskimo Dog

Average Height: 10 inches (toy), 13 inches (miniature), 17 inches (standard)

Average Weight: 8 pounds (toy), 15 pounds (miniature), 30 pounds (standard)

Personality: Intelligent, Social

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Medium Length

Life Expectancy: 13-15 years

The pure white double coat on an American Eskimo Dog will soon be everywhere, like a dusting of snow. To make your life easier, brush them a few times a week to catch these endless white hairs before they end up all over your sofa. Bathing Eskies too often can irritate their skin, so check with your vet or groomer before plopping your pup in the bath.

Dogs that Shed the Most Bernese Mountain Dog
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3. Bernese Mountain Dog

Height: 23-28 inches

Weight: 70-115 pounds

Personality: Calm, Friendly

Activity Level: Moderate to High

Coat Type: Double, Medium to Long Length

Life Expectancy: 7-10 years

Talk about hair everywhere. The Bernese Mountain dog needed a thick, double coat to survive harsh winters in the mountains of Switzerland. Beautifully marked, these dogs have black, white and tan coats that are dense and wooly. They’re as friendly as they are furry, so get ready to brush frequently and be covered in hair.

Dogs that Shed the Most Chow Chow
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4. Chow Chow

Height: 17 - 20 inches

Weight: 45 - 70 pounds

Personality: Stubborn, Loyal

Activity Level: Moderate

Coat Type: Double, Medium Length

Life Expectancy: 8-12 years

Chow Chows are so furry they look like lions with heavy manes of rust-colored hair. Their double coats are smooth underneath and slightly rough on top. Without frequent brushing, a Chow Chow’s coat can develop nasty knots.

Dogs that Shed the Most Doberman
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5. Doberman

Height: 24-28 inches

Weight: 60-100 pounds

Personality: Brave, Alert

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Single, Smooth, Short

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years

Now, here’s a dog with a smooth, short, single-layered coat that also sheds a ton. Dobermans are also big dogs, so there’s a lot of surface area full of hair ready to shed. Their shiny black and tan coats add an extra level of chic to their overall physique. To keep them looking their best, try brushing at least once per day.

Dogs that Shed the Most German Shepherd
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6. German Shepherd

Average Height: 22-26 inches

Average Weight: 50-90 pounds

Personality: Loyal, Confident

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Medium Length

Life Expectancy: 7-10 years

German Shepherds are known for their hard-working mentality and incredible ability to shed constantly. While most often recognized by their black and tan fur, they can also come in shades of gray, cream, red and white. A German Shepherd’s undercoat is soft and their overcoat is rough; a tough exterior with a cuddly interior, just like their personalities.

Dogs that Shed the Most Golden Retriever
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7. Golden Retriever

Height: 21-24 inches

Weight: 55-75 pounds

Personality: Friendly, Devoted

Activity Level: Moderate to High

Coat Type: Double, Medium to Long Length

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years

One interaction with a Golden Retriever is enough to know how much they love people—and how much they shed. Ranging from dark rusty gold to bright yellow gold, these dogs are literally named after their luscious locks. A Golden’s coat is also water-repellent.

Dogs that Shed the Most Great Pyrenees
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8. Great Pyrenees

Height: 25-32 inches

Weight: 85-110 pounds

Personality: Calm, Sweet

Activity Level: Low

Coat Type: Double, Medium to Long Length

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years

Think of a Golden Retriever but bigger. With more hair. And brighter hair, so it’s easier to see. That’s the Great Pyrenees. Thankfully, their thick coats resist knots and don’t trap dirt, so grooming is a breeze. Just run a brush through their hair a few times a week. And vacuum a lot.

Dogs that Shed the Most Labrador Retriever
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9. Labrador Retriever

Height: 21-25 inches

Weight: 55-80 pounds

Personality: Outgoing, Fun-loving

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Short Length

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years

Another great example of a short coat with plenty of shedding power. A Labrador Retriever’s double coat is short, so it’s more difficult to distinguish between layers. Have no fear, they’re both there. Actually, both water-resistant layers end up everywhere. These dogs are so sweet and energetic, it’s easy to forgive the shower of hair that follows them everywhere.

Dogs that Shed the Most Old English Sheepdog
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10. Old English Sheepdog

Height: 21-22 inches

Weight: 60-100 pounds

Personality: Adaptable, Gentle

Activity Level: Moderate

Coat Type: Double, Long Length

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years

An Old English Sheepdog might be the poster child for dogs that shed. Their shaggy fur bounces as they move and requires more grooming and attention than many of the dogs on our list. Be prepared for weekly grooming sessions; trimming the fur a bit is wise if your Old English Sheepdog isn’t prepping for a show.

Dogs that Shed the Most Pembroke Welsh Corgi
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11. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Height: 10-12 inches

Weight: 28-30 pounds

Personality: Playful, Affectionate

Activity Level: Moderate

Coat Type: Double, Short Length

Life Expectancy: 12-13 years

Is there anything cuter than a Pembroke Welsh Corgi trotting over to sit in your lap? No! But get ready for them to leave a pile of red, fawn or tan fur when they get up. Like most double-coated breeds, their soft undercoats are covered by thick, slightly coarser overcoats. Pembroke Welsh Corgis also developed weatherproof fur over time, as they were bred to herd animals outdoors for long stretches of time.

Dogs that Shed the MostSaint Bernard
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12. Saint Bernard

Height: 26-30 inches

Weight: 120-180 pounds

Personality: Charming, Watchful

Activity Level: Moderate

Coat Type: Double, Short to Long Length

Life Expectancy: 8-10 years

Though their double coat acts up seasonally, expect a decent amount of fur year-round from Saint Bernards. As a dog bred to withstand harsh conditions in the Swiss Alps, these dogs have as much fur as they do love to give. They also come in long and short coated varieties.

Dogs that Shed the Most Samoyed
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13. Samoyed

Height: 19-24 inches

Weight: 35-65 pounds

Personality: Sweet, Adaptable

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Long Length

Life Expectancy: 12-14 years

Like the American Eskimo Dog, Samoyeds have snow white double coats. These coats keep their bodies warm in winter and keep your floors covered in hair. Again, seasonal changes are going to increase the amount this pup sheds, but don’t worry. There will still be plenty of hair floating around at all times.

Dogs that Shed the Most Shiba Inu
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14. Shiba Inu

Height: 13.5-16.5 inches

Weight: 17-23 pounds

Personality: Affectionate, Protective

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Short Length

Life Expectancy: 13-16 years

Shiba Inus can be red, tan, sesame and black. They can also be world-class shedders. While brushing Shibas during shedding season (aka, all year) can help trap hair before it gathers around your home, you don’t need to worry about knots or tangles in their short coats.

Dogs that Shed the Most Siberian Husky
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15. Siberian Husky

Height: 20 - 24 inches

Weight: 30 - 60 pounds

Personality: Social, Loyal

Activity Level: High

Coat Type: Double, Medium Length

Life Expectancy: 12-14 years

Siberian Huskies are thickly coated dogs who shed plenty of hair throughout the year, especially as the seasons change. The American Kennel Club says aside from the ample amount of hair constantly falling off of them, Huskies are relatively clean dogs. Don’t overbathe them.

RELATED: Wondering How to Groom a Dog at Home? Here’s Everything You Need

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