15 Expressions You’ll Hear Only in the South
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Southerners are a special bunch. With their warm hospitality, distinct drawls and charming slang, it’s no wonder they’re so beloved…and imitated. Here, all the phrases Southerners grew up hearing. (And if you didn’t, get ready for a schoolin’.)

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Get the clicker.
That’s Southern for “Change the channel because Ole Miss is fixin’ to get whooped.”

Fixin’ to
Interchangeable with “about to.”

Fixin’ to get whooped
“About to get beat in a heated SEC football game.” (Sorry, Ole Miss, you can commiserate with Arkansas.) 

She was madder than an old wet hen.
Imagine the anger of a Georgian lady caught with wet hair.

Go-cup
New Orleanian speak for taking your cocktail out in a plastic cup. It’s legal, y’all.

Stop being ugly.
It’s not about a pretty face. It’s what your momma tells ya when you’re misbehaving.

Back when I was knee-high to a grasshopper
“Before I was old enough for go-cups.”

Bless her heart.
All encompassing, this expression works on a sick child (sincere) or a chubby cheerleader (take your guesses).

Gettin' a little big for her britches.
Spoken in gossip, it means Darlene thinks she's too good for the county fair.

Yes, ma’am.
Never offensive. Always expected.

The higher the hair, the closer to God.
Texan speak for “Backcomb those bangs till they reach the ceiling.”

I’m as full as a tick!
No more banana pudding for me, thank you.

Spit in one hand and wish in the other, and see which one fills up first.
It means that doin’ is better than thinkin’.

Ain’t
A conjunction that works for two verbs: “am not” (“I ain’t missing the tailgate in Tuscaloosa this weekend.”) and “do not” (“But I ain’t got time to make the potato salad for it.”)

Don’t let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya.
"'Bout time you get on home, Darlene."

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