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How the Slow Clothing Movement Could Save You Money
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We’ve heard about slow food and slow parenting. But slow fashion? Now you’ve got our attention. For anyone who’s self-diagnosed with a slight (OK, rampant) online shopping addiction, a mindful approach to shopping could be revolutionary for both your closet and your wallet. Not to mention the planet. The fashion industry is reportedly one of the world’s most polluting

One woman, who transformed her spending in order to quit her desk job and travel full-time, credits “the slow clothing movement” with being key to her mission: “I bought secondhand, and decluttered by selling items I didn’t need on sites like ThredUp.” Her profit? $2,000.

How to speed up this process?

Step 1: Swedish death clean for cash. Purge your closet of anything that doesn’t bring you joy (a tip of our ’90s fedora to you, Marie Kondo). Then consign or donate all your excess clothes to sites like TheRealReal, the aforementioned Thread Up or Goodwill, which will provide the necessary documents to request a tax write-off. Dear “going out tops”: Just get out.

Step 2: Buy mindfully going forward. Conspicuous consumption is out; conscious consumption is in. For some, this may mean only buying new jeans once your old ones have been worn out past the point of patching. To others, it’s eschewing trend-driven, fast-fashion looks that last only a season anyway (we mean you, rayon-poly-blend harem pants and crop tank of summer 2015). But overall, it simply means educating yourself about where your clothes come from and who makes them, seeking out eco-conscious designers who prioritize ethical manufacturing practices, environmentally-sustainable materials or even create clothes that can be worn in every season. The ultra-hip essentials line AYR literally stands for “All Year Round.” Waste not, want not. Or, in the case of that dreamy summer dress, want it, then walk away.  

RELATED: What the Heck Is ‘Swedish Death Cleaning’ and Why Is It Sweeping Scandinavia?

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