Whitney Museum of American Art
Mike Kelley (1954-2012), the "Mobile Homestead" in front of the abandoned Detroit Central Train Station, 2010. Copyright Mike Kelley. Photograph by Corine Vermuelen. Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Unless you're a big-time art collector, standing in a gallery or museum probably doesn't make you feel at home. Here to change that are three hot exhibits that take their cues from all things domestic.

Playing House Ever wonder what an 1860s smoking lounge looked like? How about a Deco Park Avenue apartment? Find out via the Brooklyn Museum's curated period rooms--original, historical rooms that have been reassembled inside the museum to reflect the way real Americans--of various locations and economic classes--would have actually lived. Runs through August 26 at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway (at Washington Ave.); 718-638-5000 or brooklynmuseum.org

The Hot Winds That Blow from the West Delhi-based artist Bharti Kher has always been interested in the interplay between the metaphysical and the concrete. For her latest show, "The Hot Winds That Blow from the West," she repurposed common household items and fixtures--old rakes, radiators, mirrors and staircases--into gorgeous and surprising works that explore issues of gender and class. Runs through April 14 at Hauser & Wirth, 32 E. 69th St. (at Madison Ave.); 212-794-4970 or hauserwirth.com

Mobile Homestead Following Los Angeles artist Mike Kelley's untimely death this January, his Mobile Homestead--a to-scale recreation of his Detroit childhood home--holds particular significance. Up now at the Whitney Biennial are several films that honor both Kelley's life and the journey his reproduction took on the back of a flatbed truck in 2010. Runs through May 27 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, 945 Madison Ave. (at 75th St.); 212-570-3600 or whitney.org

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