Kiriko
Spray the hidden "scent stick" with fragrance and slip it into the tag.

Tomboy-chic is cool. Upcycling is de rigueur. Portland is so hip, it?s practically a caricature.

So by all intents and purposes, Kiriko scarves--which are handmade in Oregon from androgynously cool vintage fabrics--should be the trendiest things on the planet.

And yet, they feel timeless.

Dawn Yanagihara and Katsu Tanaka, the folks behind the year-old company, pride themselves on seamlessly blending Japanese craftsmanship with American sustainability; fabrics are sourced from antiques dealers in Japan, and the duo works to use every bit of material--for neckties ($78) and pocket squares ($27), as well as the showstopping scarves ($78 to $129).

Though every Kiriko material is gorgeous, our favorite is definitely the 50- to 100-year-old boro fabric (a.k.a. Japanese indigo). Used throughout the country?s history for bags, pants, blankets and more, boro truly represents the too-good-to-waste mentality. Plus, the results are simply stunning.

Even better, each scarf comes with a handy pin for fastening close and a hidden ?scent stick,? which you can spray with fragrance and slip into the tag. Just spritz the stick (never the scarf--perfume can damage the fabric) when you get dressed and enjoy the olfactory pleasure that will follow you around all day.

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