Cindy Sherman's "Untitled Film Still #21," 1978; The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

You might think you know photographer Cindy Sherman?s work. After all, she?s responsible for some of the most recognizable portraits in modern art.

Sherman, who is famous for dressing up as characters like old screen sirens, society ladies, zombies and clowns and then photographing herself in those personas, is more enigmatic and talented than we could have imagined, as evidenced in Cindy Sherman, the new exhibition of more than 150 pieces of her work at the Dallas Museum of Art.

From her acclaimed film stills--an installation of 70 small photographs hung in a film-strip formation--to her giant 2008 society portraits, which are eerily prescient about the state of the country?s economy at that time, there?s a common thread throughout the exhibition: Like Sherman herself, nothing is what it seems.

Take the centerpiece of the show, four photographic murals created specifically for the museum?s noted Barrel Vault gallery. Arranged facing one another, they depict Sherman as four different characters, among them a Renaissance maiden and a squinty-eyed former prom queen.

In each piece, Sherman?s makeup-free face is Photoshopped, her eyes made smaller and her nose longer; she?s virtually indistinguishable in each shot, a bravura accomplishment for even this celebrated shutterbug.

?Cindy Sherman? runs through June 9 at the Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood St., 214-922-1200. Special exhibition tickets ($16) are required.

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