Lucian Freud: Portraits
Photos courtesy Lucian Freud Archive

Forgive us if we start speaking with a mild British accent.

With the Olympics in full force (and after months of seemingly endless celebrations like the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and Prince William’s 30th birthday), it feels as if the world has gone U.K.-crazy.

So it should come as no surprise that the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth has gotten in on the action in a big way with its special exhibition “Lucian Freud: Portraits.” (General admission is $10.)

The exhibit comes to The Modern thanks to Michael Auping, the museum’s chief curator, who forged a close relationship with Freud when he was granted a series of interviews with the late artist.

Widely considered the greatest portrait painter of the 20th century, Freud created visceral renderings that ran the gamut in subject from neighbors to friends to lovers. In between, he even painted royalty. Nonconformist that he was, the British artist, whose grandfather was Sigmund, insisted on working with live models, never from photographs.

Fort Worth is the exhibition’s only stop in the United States. (After Freud’s death in 2011, the value of his work skyrocketed; a show of this magnitude would be too expensive for other museums to insure.) Consisting of nearly 90 works, the exhibition was organized by London’s National Portrait Gallery this past spring, where Kate Middleton attended its opening.

Fascinators are optional.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817-738-9215

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