Gone Girl. The Silent Wife. The Husband’s Secret. There’s definitely a trendy literary subgenre about crazy-disturbed marriage dynamics.

The latest addition to the reading list is You Should Have Known, the new page-turner from Jean Hanff Korelitz, who is best known for her 2009 novel, Admission.

At the center is Grace Reinhart Sachs, esteemed wife, mother and Upper East Side therapist. She’s on the brink of publishing a self-help book--also called You Should Have Known--in which she cautions women to listen to what the men in their lives are really telling them. (If he’s mean to your friends on date one, he’ll be mean to your friends forever. If he seems a little gay, he’s probably gay.) The book is poised to be a best seller, and after years of hard work it seems like Grace has really made it.

That is, until her seemingly perfect doctor husband goes missing in the wake of a violent murder--upending everything she thought she knew.

Korelitz masterfully renders her character’s self-delusion and blind spots. (C’mon, who hasn’t looked past a teensy flaw in the name of passion?) And even though the novel’s second half lags, You Should Have Known remains one of those books you simply cannot put down.

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