Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead
Photo courtesy of Matt Albiani

If you haven't heard of Sheryl Sandberg and Lean In by now, you’re probably living under a rock. But no matter how you may feel about her impassioned take on women in the workplace--and why they should "lean in" to the table rather than sit back--it's important to at least understand the argument.

Here, we've rounded up the major points so you can participate in the discussion (even if you're too busy working to read the book):

Don't let your fear of being disliked hold you back You may fundamentally want to feel liked, but Sandberg strongly recommends learning how to handle criticism to quell self-doubt. Making important decisions at the office won't please everyone--and if you're keeping everyone happy, you're probably not doing your job.

Don’t accept the first offer But do provide a legitimate explanation behind your request for more compensation. (E.g., "My understanding is that jobs with these responsibilities are worth a salary within this range.")

Employ authentic, appropriate communication Sandberg advocates for using simple language, addressing problems as they come up and soliciting input from partners both at home and in the office.

Don't try to do it all Perfection is the enemy! Make choices deliberately (go home at 5:30 each day; stay offline on weekends) and stick to them.

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