Liz Prince has always loved drawing, dug baseball and hated dresses. In short, she was a tomboy. It wasn’t a big deal to her. (C’mon... gender norms... blech.) But it was a problem for many people in her life. Girls would tease her, boys would shun her, and her parents were always seeking to make their daughter just a tad more normal.

In her new graphic memoir (think comic book meets autobiography), Tomboy, Prince details her early years in words and pictures--and the result is both bleakly funny and achingly relatable, even if you weren’t a tomboy yourself.

Starting at age 4 and moving through elementary, middle and high school, Prince chronicles the formative experiences that made her who she is now. There was the time she insisted on dressing like Indiana Jones instead of a fairy princess, the time she freaked out at the lingerie store when forced to buy a bra, the time a boy she liked passed her over for someone more pink and bubbly.

Prince’s simple pen-and-ink drawings perfectly exemplify her plucky nature and slyly complement her feminist message: When we propagate the notion that there’s only one version of “womanhood,” we limit the creative potential of girls everywhere.

From Around The Web