You may have heard that Banksy, the provocative street artist, has resurfaced in the war-torn region of Gaza. And whenever he releases new works, the world can't help but talk about the most elusive man alive. Scroll through to see his latest, plus six more memorable pieces by the artist.

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Playful Kitten, 2015

Banksy most recently resurfaced in Gaza, where he painted three murals, including the one above. He also made a short video with a satirical bent giving a glimpse of life in the war-torn region.

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Crayola Shooter, 2011

On a trip to L.A., the artist made this painting of a child soldier shooting colorful crayon bullets. And shortly after it appeared, the image went viral as audiences debated its meaning. 

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Crazy Horses, 2013

A mural of crazed, stampeding horses wearing night-vision goggles mysteriously appeared on Manhattan's Lower East Side during Banksy's month-long residency in NYC. The piece came with accompanying audio--a clip of a U.S. air strike in Baghdad released by Wikileaks.

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Flower Thrower, 2003

In Jerusalem, he painted this cry for peace (which might be his most well-known work): a mural depicting a man throwing flowers in place of a Molotov cocktail. 

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There Is Always Hope, 2007

In London's South Bank, Banksy painted a girl losing her red heart-shaped balloon to the wind. Be sure not to overlook the quote etched into the background.

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Sweep It Under the Carpet, 2006

When this piece first appeared in Chalk Farm, London, people claimed it was Banksy's attempt to criticize the British government. "This is a portrait of a maid called Leanne who cleaned my room in a Los Angeles motel. She was quite a feisty lady," Banksy rebuted in a post on his website. 

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You Have Beautiful Eyes, 2005

During a 2003 stunt in London's Tate Museum, Banksy secretly hung a painting in one of the galleries. A few years later, he performed a similar stunt and hung the piece shown above in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2005. 

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