An eyeball. A Pegasus. A herd of cattle. Chances are you’ve seen these installations decorating the streets of Dallas. And, if you’re like us, chances are you have little to no clue what most of these works mean (or who made them). Here, the backstory on eight pieces of art around town.

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Eye by Tony Tasset

In 2013, the Joule Hotel installed this piece, which is modeled after the artist’s own eyeball. While some insist it has a deeper meaning (hello, Big Brother), Tasset says it’s just an eye. We guess it’s all in how you, um, see it.

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Pegasus by Harold Wineburgh of Texlite, Inc.

The original porcelain-and-neon structure was installed by the Magnolia Oil Company (which was eventually absorbed by ExxonMobil) to mark the 1949 meeting of the American Petroleum Institute. Thankfully, the decaying Pegasus was totally replaced in 1999--because what’s Dallas without its iconic flying horse all aglow?

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Traveling Man by Brad Oldham and Brandon Oldenburg

The set of three stainless-steel robots was installed to mark the DART’s expansion to Deep Ellum. Local artists Oldham and Oldenburg wanted to acknowledge the neighborhood’s rich musical history--hence the heads shaped like guitars and perching songbirds--as well as the area's future growth.

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Ad Astra by Mark di Suvero

This is Di Suvero’s sixth installation in Dallas (and his only indoor public sculpture in the world right now). Originally built in 2005 in the middle of a hay field in New York, the 48-foot piece was brought south by the Nasher family after the renovation of NorthPark Center in 2006.

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Trail Drive Steer by Robert Summers

To memorialize the 19th-century cattle drives that took place along the Shawnee Trail--which some say were the humble beginnings of Dallas--the 70 bronze steers and three trail riders were commissioned by Trammell Crow for a piece of public land known as Pioneer Plaza in Downtown Dallas.

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The Archer by Allie Tennant

The Hall of State building was erected for the 1936 Texas Centennial Exhibition with an 11-foot-tall gold-leafed bronze statue of a Tejas Indian poised in the middle. The Archer represents the Native American ancestry of the land that would eventually become Texas.

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Lakewood Library Love by Dallas Yarn Bombers

“Knit one, purl two” takes on a whole new meaning with the Dallas Yarn Bombers--a local group that aims to beautify the city one stitch at a time. Check out their work in Bishop Arts, Heritage Village, Restland Cemetery, Klyde Warren Park and Lakewood (pictured here).

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Sun Up at Quorum by John V. House

Located in Addison, the equinox marker, well, marks the vernal and autumnal equinox. When the sun’s rays pass through an aperture at the top, a design is cast on the sphere below. So pencil in a trip this September 23 and thank us later.

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